Obliteride Wrap-up!

Over the last three months, Suzanna and I donned out bike jerseys and shorts, grabbed our bikes, and trained so we would be ready to ride 50 miles on Sunday, August 9th. Well, Sunday came around, the weather was sunny (but thankfully not too sunny), and Suzanna and I had a great time pedaling 50Continue reading “Obliteride Wrap-up!”

Back to the Real World

In my work at Fred Hutch I collect and manage data on cancer patients.  Every day when I come to work, I have to temporarily suspend my empathy for the patients we study and disconnect my emotions or I’d lose my objectivity and quite possibly my mind and never get any work done. The people and their experiences we studyContinue reading “Back to the Real World”

A Day in the Life of a Cancer Programmer

I consider myself very lucky to have the privilege to work at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, which we affectionately call Fred Hutch. I manage a small team of programmers in creating custom solutions to support the world-renowned research that is happening here. In this post, I thought I’d give you an idea of whatContinue reading “A Day in the Life of a Cancer Programmer”

Running for Me but Riding for Them

This past Saturday, Suzanna and I jumped on our bikes and rode 30 miles as part of our training for the 50 mile Obliteride bike ride on August 9th to raise money for Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, where I also happen to work. Then on Sunday, we drove up to Snoqualmie Pass, got off at the HyakContinue reading “Running for Me but Riding for Them”

Cancer Gets Personal

As many of you know, I work at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (or simply Fred Hutch). It’s a very rewarding job knowing that I am helping scientists crack the code of cancer and save lives. But to be honest, when working in cancer research, it’s very easy to keep the suffering from cancer at aContinue reading “Cancer Gets Personal”

Kicking Off Obliteride 2015 Training and Fundraising

A couple of days ago I decided to join Obilteride 2015. I also participated in this fundraiser for the amazing place where I work back in 2013. This year, I am riding the 50 mile ride with my wife, Suzanna. Unlike many charity events, 100% of the money raised for Obliteride goes to fund the awesome workContinue reading “Kicking Off Obliteride 2015 Training and Fundraising”

My Obliteride

Two weeks ago on Saturday, I got up at 5:30 am after a night of not-so-restful sleep. (We had thunder and lightning much of the night and I was a little anxious about the ride.) Unfortunately for Suzanna, she had to wake up two hours earlier since she was on the first volunteer Saturday shiftContinue reading “My Obliteride”

Better Care Starts with a Better Diagnosis

You may have read the recent article about the National Cancer Institute coming up with more precise language when talking about cancer. Sounds silly perhaps, but this is so important when dealing with this scary disease and the language that physicians use can subtly change the care given to patients as well as their comfortContinue reading “Better Care Starts with a Better Diagnosis”

Keeping Track of Leukemia Specimens

Over seven years ago, I was asked to create a system to help scientists keep track of specimens at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center where I work. The system I created, the AML Specimen Bank, is still used today by researchers studying an often fatal type of leukemia in children called acute myeloid leukemia orContinue reading “Keeping Track of Leukemia Specimens”

Double Dipping

So the reality of my late summer athletic commitments has finally settled in. I’m training for both a September marathon (the tiny Tunnel Lite marathon) and the August 50-mile cancer fund-raising bike ride (Obliteride). What this means… I need to run five days a week including one long run on Saturday and one hill orContinue reading “Double Dipping”